Remembrance of Things Past

Mostly about growing up the 1950s in Ilford, Essex.

[32] ‘Dedicated to the One I Love’

2 Comments

A continuation of my musical reminiscences, following [26] ‘All I want is Music, Music, Music, Music!’

More songs that I have loved and remembered, more or less in alphabetical order.

29. House of the Rising SunThe Animals (1964)

A traditional folk song about a tragic life in New Orleans, which became a classic pop tune of its time.

There is a house in New Orleans; They call the Rising Sun;

And it’s been the ruin of many a poor boy; And God I know I’m one …

Oh mother tell your children; Not to do what I have done;

Spend your lives in sin and misery; In the House of the Rising Sun …

30. I Can’t Stop Loving YouRay Charles (1962)

Because: Ray Charles was a great soul singer, one of the few totally blind singers to make a major impact in the world of Music. Another one is Stevie Wonder, known as Little Stevie Wonder when he was young!

I'm_Forever_Blowing_Bubbles

31. I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles

Because: It reminds me of my father.

Wikipedia says that this is a popular American song from 1918. It is also popular with the fans of West Ham United Football Club. West Ham was not far from being our nearest football club. My father never mentioned any football allegiance, but one of my very earliest memories is of him singing this to me. (The link is to West Ham at Wembley Stadium.)

32. I’m not in Love10 cc (1975)

Because: I absolutely love it. Another love song I just can’t leave out, even though it’s 1975!

roy-orbison-photo-david-redfern

33. In DreamsRoy Orbison (1963)

I keep wanting to use the word ‘haunting’ for the songs I pick, meaning sad and evocative. Wikipedia uses the words ‘dark, emotional’ for Roy Orbison. He was a singer songwriter, with a powerful voice, always seen with trademark sunglasses. This is the best known of his darkly emotional ballads. (Or perhaps, ‘Crying,’ just as powerful, just as emotional.)

34. In the MoodThe Glenn Miller Orchestra

Beause: It’s a very early memory. Trombonist Glenn Miller led this orchestra, which entertained the troops through the Second War. Their tunes continued to be played after his death (Missing in Action in 1944.)

35. In the Year 2525Zager and Evans (1969)

Because: It was another classic, with prophetic words – more science fiction than pop. It topped the charts in America for six weeks. I suspect that he will be proved a bit inaccurate in his dates:

In the year 2525; if man is still alive; If woman can survive, they may find.

In the year 3535; Ain’t gonna need to tell the truth, tell no lie; Everything you think, do and say; Is in the pill you took today

In the year 4545; You ain’t gonna need your teeth, won’t need your eyes; You won’t find a thing to chew; Nobody’s gonna look at you.

In the year 5555; Your arms hangin’ limp at your sides; Your legs got nothin’ to do; Some machine’s doin’ that for you

In the year 6565; Ain’t gonna need no husband, won’t need no wife; You’ll pick your son, pick your daughter too; From the bottom of a long glass tube.

In the year 7510; If God’s a-coming, He oughta make it by then; Maybe He’ll look around Himself and say; “Guess it’s time for the Judgement Day.”

In the year 8510; God is gonna shake His mighty head; He’ll either say, “I’m pleased where man has been;” Or tear it down, and start again.

In the year 9595; I’m kinda wonderin’ if man is gonna be alive; He’s taken everything this old earth can give; And he ain’t put back nothing.

Now it’s been ten thousand years, man has cried a billion tears; For what, he never knew, now man’s reign is through; But through eternal night, the twinkling of starlight; So very far away, maybe it’s only yesterday.

36. JudyElvis Presley (1961) and …

37. Judy, Judy, JudyJohnny Tillotson (1963)

Just Because

38. Lady MadonnaThe Beatles (1968)

Because: I had to pick one by The Beatles. Nothing by the Beatles could be typical, so I just picked one.

39. Laughing PolicemanCharles Jolly (Charles Penrose) 1926

OK, this is the exception. I remember this as a children’s song, mostly from Two-Way Family Favourites. I hadn’t realized it was quite so old. Wikipedia describes it as a Music Hall song. (I am not old enough to remember Music Hall, but I do remember The Good Old Days on television.) I hated it then and I still do!

40. Little Drummer BoyBeverley Sisters (1959)

See: [9] Bedecked with Bay and Rosemary

41. LocomotionLittle Eva

One of those pop songs from the era when every new song could have its own dance.

42. Look Through Any WindowThe Hollies (1965)

Because: I am a great fan of the Hollies. It was hard to pick one of the Hollies’ hits. They had several, continuing into the seventies.

43. Major-General (‘Modern Major-general’s Song’ from The Pirates of Penzance) – Gilbert and Sullivan

See: [16] To Make the Punishment fit the Crime

44. Maria ElenaLos Indios Tabajaras

Because: Los Indios Tabajaras were two brothers, native to Brazil, who sang to their own guitar playing as early as 1943. They found success with just one record. It was given to me as a birthday present in 1963 and I love it. I still have it. The ‘B’ side, Jungle Dream is just as good.

45. Mary’s Boy ChildHarry Belafonte (1956)

See: [9] Bedecked with Bay and Rosemary

46. Mikado (‘A More Humane Mikado’ from The Mikado) – Gilbert and Sullivan

See: [16] To Make the Punishment fit the Crime

47. MiserereAllegri

Because: It’s a great piece of choral music. This one would come in my Desert Island six. I sneaked it in. There is absolutely no association with the fifties.

(Written in 1514. For three hundred years it was performed every year in the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican, but the music could not be written down, on pain of excommunication – so it was never sung elsewhere. Mozart at fourteen transcribed the nine-part harmony from memory! The Pope complimented the young Mozart and withdrew the ban.)

48. Muffin the MuleAnnette Mills

Because: my earliest memories of television come from this programme, which ran from 1946 to 1955, with its familiar signature tune. (For Children’s television, see: [29] ‘ Was it Bill or was it Ben?’ coming soon.)

49. My Old Man’s a DustmanLonnie Donnegan

See: [22] ‘Of Shoes and Ships and Sealing Wax’

50. My Song is Love Unknown

Because: St Andrew’s Church and its choir were part of my early life so I have to include a hymn. I enjoyed singing them and still do. This is my favourite.

‘… Love to the loveless shown, that they might lovely be …’

51. The National Anthem of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

Because: This used to be much more part of daily life, played at the end of theatre and cinema performances, and on closedown of BBC radio stations at night. (24-hour television and radio are relatively new.) In the early days, people would stand for it, even when played on the radio. [US readers will recognize the tune as: ‘My Country, ‘tis of Thee.’]

It has no official status as an anthem and use of additional verses is not standardized. Until the recent trend towards devolution, it was always accepted as the National Anthem at sporting events where teams represented England, Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland, but various alternatives have emerged for these divisions of the UK.

52. Nellie the ElephantMandy Miller

A children’s song, familiar probably from Two-Way Family Favourites.

53. New York Mining Disaster 1941The Bee Gees (1967)

When the record was released, many people thought it was by The Beatles. It’s a disaster record, a bit like Ellen Vannin, written as if by the trapped miners, possibly inspired by the 1966 disaster in Aberfan.

The_Moody_Blues

54. Nights in White SatinThe Moody Blues (1967)

Because: I love the music of Justin Hayward and the Moody Blues. I don’t always follow the words of songs in full. This is obviously a love song with the drawn out cries of: “Cause I love you; Yes, I love you; Oh, how, I love you; Oh, how, I love you.”

I have to admit that until I wrote this blog post I always thought it was: Knights in White Satin! I led a sheltered life!

55. Nut RockerB Bumble and the Stingers. (1962)

One of the first two records I bought. A ‘jazzed up’ version of Tchaikovsky.

56. Oh My Darling, Clementine

An example of the songs we sang at school in Music lessons.

57. Old ShepElvis Presley (1956)

Because: I’m a softy for sad tales. One of the saddest songs ever written. (See also Two Little Boys.)

58. Orange Blossom SpecialThe Spotnicks (1963)

Because: At the time, its recording methods were revolutionary. Fast moving, instrumental. At a time when other electric guitars were connected to their amplifiers by cables, the Spotnicks used small radio transmitters. It gave their tunes an unusual tone.

Buddy_Holly_&_The_Crickets_publicity_portrait_-_cropped

59. Peggy SueBuddy Holly and the Crickets

Buddy Holly’s life as a singer was very short but after his death recordings kept coming regularly for years. Peggy Sue was a classic, but he had several others.

To end this post:

60. Dedicated to the One I LoveThe Mamas and the Papas (1967)

Reminiscent of several groups from the sixties and seventies, it reminds me of America, but mostly

Because: I like it, and because: This is Dedicated to the One I Love.

 

Author: Alan

Retired, currently living in Cheltenham.

2 thoughts on “[32] ‘Dedicated to the One I Love’

  1. Pingback: [34] ‘Everything I Do …’ | Remembrance of Things Past

  2. Pingback: [88] Christmas Comes but Once a Year | Remembrance of Things Past

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